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Ask Slashdot: Can You Say Something Nice About Systemd?

ewhac writes: "I'm probably going to deeply deeply regret this, but every time a story appears here mentioning systemd, a 700-comment thread of back-and-forth bickering breaks out which is about as informative as an old Bud Light commercial, and I don't really learn anything new about the subject. My gut reaction to systemd is (currently) a negative one, and it's very easy to find screeds decrying systemd on the net. However, said screeds haven't been enough to prevent its adoption by several distros, which leads me to suspect that maybe there's something worthwhile there that I haven't discovered yet. So I thought it might be instructive to turn the question around and ask the membership about what makes systemd good. However, before you stab at the "Post" button, there are some rules... Bias Disclosure: I currently dislike systemd because — without diving very deeply into the documentation, mind — it looks and feels like a poorly-described, gigantic mess I know nothing about that seeks to replace other poorly-described, smaller messes which I know a little bit about. So you will be arguing in that environment." Nice Things About systemd Rules: Post each new Nice Thing as a new post, not as a reply to another post. This will let visitors skim the base level of comments for things that interest them, rather than have to dive through a fractally expanding tree of comments looking for things to support/oppose. It will also make it easier to follow the next rule: Avoid duplication; read the entire base-level of comments before adding a new Nice Thing. Someone may already have mentioned your Nice Thing. Add your support/opposition to that Nice Thing there, rather than as a new post. Only one concrete Nice Thing about systemd per base-level post. Keep the post focused on a single Nice Thing systemd does. If you know of multiple distinct things, write multiple distinct posts. Describe the Nice Thing in some detail. Don't assume, for example, that merely saying "Supports Linux cgroups" will be immediately persuasive. Describe how the Nice Thing is better than existing, less controversial solutions. systemd is allegedly better at some things than sysvinit or upstart or inetd. Why? Why is the Nice Thing possible in systemd, and impossible (or extremely difficult) with anything else? (In some cases, the Nice Thing will be a completely new thing that's never existed before; describe why it's good thing.)We will assume out of the gate that systemd boots your system faster than ${SOMETHING_ELSE}, so no points for bringing that up. Bonus points are awarded for: Personal Experience. "I actually did this," counts for way more than, "The docs claim you can do this." Working Examples. Corollary to the above — if you did a Nice Thing with systemd, consider also posting the code/script/service file you wrote to accomplish it. Links to Supporting Documentation. If you leveraged a Nice Thing, furnish a link to the docs you used that describe the Nice Thing and its usage. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Slashdot Asks: Appropriate Place For Free / Open Source Software Artifacts?

A friend of mine who buys and sells used books, movies, etc. recently purchased a box full of software on CD, including quite a few old Linux distributions, and asked me if I'd like them. The truth is, I would like them, but I've already collected over the last two decades more than I should in the way of Linux distributions, on at least four kinds of media (starting with floppies made from a CD that accompanied a fat book on how to install some distribution or other -- very useful in the days of dialup). I've got some boxes (Debian Potato, and a few versions of Red Hat and Mandrake Linux), and an assortment of marketing knickknacks, T-shirts, posters, and books. I like these physical artifacts, and they're not dominating my life, but I'd prefer to actually give many of them to someplace where they'll be curated. (Or, if they should be tossed, tossed intelligently.) Can anyone point to a public collection of some kind that gathers physical objects associated with Free software and Open Source, and makes them available for others to examine? (I plan to give some hardware, like a pair of OLPC XO laptops, to the same Goodwill computer museum highlighted in this video, but they probably don't want an IBM-branded radio in the shape of a penguin.) Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Distribution Release: Zentyal Server 4.0

José Antonio Calvo has announced the release of Zentyal Server 4.0, a new version of the project's Ubuntu-based distribution designed for small business servers: "The Zentyal development team is proud to announce Zentyal Server 4.0, a new release of the open-source Linux small business server with native Microsoft....

Dangerous Vulnerability Fixed In Wget

jones_supa writes: A critical flaw has been found and patched in the open source Wget file retrieval utility that is widely used on UNIX systems. The vulnerability is publicly identified as CVE-2014-4877. "It was found that wget was susceptible to a symlink attack which could create arbitrary files, directories or symbolic links and set their permissions when retrieving a directory recursively through FTP," developer Vasyl Kaigorodov writes in Red Hat Bugzilla. A malicious FTP server can stomp over your entire filesystem, tweets HD Moore, chief research officer at Rapid 7, who is the original reporter of the bug. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Distribution Release: CentOS 6.6

Johnny Hughes has announced the release of CentOS 6.6, un updated build of the project's legacy branch, compiled from the source code for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.6: "We are pleased to announce the immediate availability of CentOS 6.6 install media for i386 and x86_64 architectures. CentOS 6.6....

Distribution Release: Puppy Linux 6.0 "Tahrpup"

Barry Kauler has announced the release of Puppy Linux 6.0 "Tahrpup" edition, a minimalist distribution compatible with Ubuntu 14.04 binary packages: "We have another official Puppy Linux release. Since I retired from developing Puppy Linux early in 2014, keen members of the Puppy community forked my Woof Puppy....

Distribution Release: LinHES 8.2

Cecil Watson has announced the release of LinHES 8.2, the latest stable version of the project's specialist Arch-based distribution designed for set-top boxes and home entertainment computers: "The LinHES dev team is pleased to announce the release of LinHES 8.2. LinHES 8.2 brings updates to the kernel, system....

Distribution Release: SUSE Linux Enterprise 12

SUSE has announced the availability of SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 "Desktop" and "Server" products, commercial distributions built primarily for deployment as enterprise desktops or servers: "SUSE today announced the general availability of SUSE Linux Enterprise 12, the newest version of its reliable, scalable and secure platform for efficiently....

Debate Over Systemd Exposes the Two Factions Tugging At Modern-day Linux

walterbyrd (182728) sends this article about systemd from Paul Venezia, who writes: In discussions around the Web in the past few months, I've seen an overwhelming level of support of systemd from Linux users who run Linux on their laptops and maybe a VPS or home server. I've also seen a large backlash against systemd from Linux system administrators who are responsible for dozens, hundreds, or thousands of Linux servers, physical and virtual. ... The release of RHEL 7 has brought the reality of systemd to a significant number of admins whose mantra is stability over all else and who perhaps had not waded into the choppier waters of Fedora or Debian unstable to work with systemd before it arrived in RHEL. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Distribution Release: MakuluLinux 1.0 "Cinnamon"

Jacque Raymer has announced the release of MakuluLinux 1.0 "Cinnamon" edition, a Debian-based distribution featuring the Cinnamon desktop environment: "It has been a dream of mine to build a Debian-based OS with Cinnamon for well over a year now, and on a few occasions I managed to actually....

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